Click on the slide!

2014 Constituent Survey

Complete Delegate Surovell's 2014 Constituent Survey to make sure your voice is heard.

More...
Click on the slide!

2014 Legislative Agenda

Legislation >> Legislation

See Delegate Surovell's legislation for the 2014 General Assembly Session.

More...
Click on the slide!

Meet Delegate Surovell

Get to know Delegate Scott Surovell and find out why and how he's fighting for Mt. Vernon's fair share.

More...
Frontpage Slideshow (version 2.0.0) - Copyright © 2006-2008 by JoomlaWorks
  • Press Releases
  • News Articles
  • The Dixie Pig Blog

DELEGATE SCOTT SUROVELL APPOINTED TO BROADBAND ADVISORY COUNCIL

May 06, 2014

Untitled document *****FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE***** May 6, 2014 More Information: Megan Howard, Legislative Aide                            571.249.4484 | scottsurovell@gmail.com DELEGATE SCOTT SUROVELL APPOINTED TO BROADBAND ADVISORY COUNCILWill Work to address technology...

Contine Reading

Del. Surovell, Friends of Little Hunting Creek and Alice Ferguson Foundation Lead Cleanup Removing T…

Apr 15, 2014

Untitled document *****FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE***** April 7, 2014 More information:    Legislative Aide, Megan Howard                               571.249.4484 | scottsurovell@gmail.com Del. Surovell, Friends of Little Hunting Creek and Alice Ferguson Foundation Lead Cleanup...

Contine Reading

<a href="/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=629&Itemid=204">More Press Releases</a>

  • Weekly Column: Children’s Issues Dominate First Hispanic Town Hall
    The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette and The Mt. Vernon Voice in the week of August 18, 2014.
    Children’s Issues Dominate First Hispanic Town Hall

    On Saturday, August 16, 2014, I held my third town hall meeting of the year and my first ever Hispanic Community Town Hall.  I was also joined by the first Democratic elected Latino State Delegate - Alfonso Lopez - who represents South Arlington and Bailey's Crossroads.  

    The Hispanic population has grown from less than one percent in Virginia in the 1970s to 8.6% today.  Here in our area, there was virtually no Hispanic population when I was a kid.  Today, the Hispanic population is the largest minority demographic in the 44th District.  One in four people who lives in the 44th District is Hispanic.

    This community represents a new and growing part of Mt. Vernon and Lee and are a growing part of the community. It’s important that we reach out to and engage every group in our area in order to have a robust conversation about the challenges we face.

    At the meeting, we discussed the following:
    • Route 1 Transit Study.
    • Healthcare Expansion for Low Income Families
    • Secondary Education Funding
    • Low Cost Internet and Computers for Students
    • Virginia DREAM Act - In-state tuition for migrant students
    • Affordable Housing 
    During the question and answer session, the main focus of the audience was improving local schools and providing more resources for children in the community.
    Attendees specifically raised concerns about the seventeen trailers at Hybla Valley Elementary School - even after a new addition to the school.  They pointed out that children cannot access bathrooms or water without going outside and back into the main building which also raises safety concerns.  
    Several mothers pointed out that Hybla Valley Elementary School does not have the same services for students as other schools in the area.  The school also does not have a Parent Teacher Association which also limits parental involvement.   

    Attendees also had concerns about the lack of any meaningful after school activities for children in their neighborhood.  Several mothers from Audubon Estates Mobile Home Park pointed out that they do not have convenient pedestrian or bike access to any parks or other activities.  The only activities accessible to children are playing street.  Several agreed that a bike and walking trails connecting Lockheed Boulevard, Audubon Estates, Mount Vernon Woods, Muddy Hole Park, and the Gum Springs Community Center would help to alleviate this problem. 

    The attendees also raised concerns about the condition of Audubon Estates, rent increases, and towing practices in their community.  

    Questions were also asked about how voting could be made more accessible to accommodate people's working schedules.  It was also suggested that legislation should be introduced to allow the Virginia DMV to issues driver's licenses to all people residing in Virginia similar to Maryland.   

    Delegate Lopez explained how his father came to the United States, acquired a college education, and helped to educate dozens of members of his extended family.  He also explained the Virginia DREAM Act and Attorney General Herring's recent decision which directed Virginia universities to extend in-state tuition to the 8,000 children granted status under President Obama's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) policy.  

    I encouraged the attendees to stay engaged in the community and we discussed setting up further meetings with other local elected officials.

    It is an honor to serve as your state delegate.  Please email me at scottsurovell@gmail.com if you have any feedback.
  • Mulligan Road/Jeff Todd Way Set to Open!
    The Mulligan Road - newly renamed Jeff Todd Way - saga is set to come to an end very soon.  The new road will run from the Roy Rogers in Woodlawn to the bottom of the large hill on Telegraph Road just south of Hayfield Secondary School.  It is a hugely needed improvement for East-West traffic flow in the Mt. Vernon-Lee Area. 

    The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) advised me today that the road will be open on August 18, 2014 with a ribbon cutting on August 25, 2014.  Here's some older articles I've written about it:



    On Sunday, August 10, 2014, I "inspected" the new road on my bike with my new GoPro camera.  You can see my video at 4x speed below the flip (sorry there is no music).






    The road is a MUCH needed connection between 22309 and the Hayfield/Kingstowne area.  It's about 2.5 miles long and is looking great. 

    It includes a mixed use path along the south end which the FHWA says the contractor is striving to complete by opening. 

    It road was funded by Federal, State and Local government, and took forever to finish for a number of reasons, but it's done.  You can read more information about the project here:

    http://www.efl.fhwa.dot.gov/projects/rhtrc.aspx

    The new shopping center at Beulah Road and Telegraph Road is starting to take shape including numerous "Wegman's towers."  Relief is finally coming to 22309.
  • Judge Martin V.B. Bostetter, Jr.
    When I got out of law school, the economy was still in the doldrums.  The firm seemed to have a few post-divorce bankruptcies coming through and the partners needed someone to figure them out so it fell to the new guy - me.  That's how I became a bankruptcy lawyer among other things.

    At the time, there were two judges in the Alexandria Division Courthouse - Stephen Mitchell and the Chief Judge - Martin V.B. Bostetter, Jr.  I went on to try a few cases to both of them.

    Last week, I learned of the passing of Judge Bostetter at the age of 88.

    While I did not practice regularly before him and only practice before him for three of his forty years on the bench, I will never forget the day I was sworn in.


    To become a member of the bar of a federal court, you have to certify that you've read all the rules and the local rules.  I actually did this.

    My partner, John Cummins, moved my admission to the bear before Judge Bostetter.  Normally, the judge asks you a few questions about your law school, makes a joke about your boss, etc.  Judge Bostetter thought it would be appropriate to cross examine me about my effort preparing for my swearing in.

    After looking me over he said, "now you better have read those rules because if you walk into my courtroom and you don't know the law and you don't know the rules, I'll tell you that, and make a fool of you in here right in front of your client!  Got it?" While thinking (holy crap), I said, "uh huh."

    With that, he made a big smile and said "welcome to Bankruptcy Court!"

    Good advice.  

    He served as a U.S. Bankruptcy Judge from 1959 until 1999.  He was Chief Judge for the entire Eastern District including Richmond and Norfolk from 1985 until his retirement.  He was among the longest to ever serve.  The courthouse in Alexandria on South Washington Street is named for him.

    Rest in Peace. 
  • New Sherwood Hall Lane Bike Lanes
    While I was on vacation, VDOT finishing the paving operations on Sherwood Hall Lane.

    The striping is still in progress, but the new bike lanes are on the ground.  VDOT still has to pain bike lane symbols in the ground, a few stripes here and there, and install signage, but they are now on the ground and usable.

    I took them for a test spin with my new GoPro camera on Sunday, August 10, 2014 around 11:30 a.m.  You can see my ride a double speed below.

    Multimodal improvements are critical to get more cars off the road.  It is also hoped that by restricting lane size, this will help to lower speeds and illegal passing on Sherwood Hall Lane which has become a real problem with increased cut through traffic. 

    These improvements were the result of two public hearings and significant public input.   These lanes will eventually link into to a multiuse path on U.S. 1 and other bike lanes as U.S. 1 is redone, properties are redeveloped and road repaved.

  • Legislative Inaction and Legislative Efficiency?
    I was reading the Washington Post this morning and an article about legislative inaction in the U.S. Congress.

    Congress passed 140 in the 112th Congress (2011-2012) resulting in 2,324 pages of new laws.  As of July 8, 2014, the 113th Congress has passed 125 new laws resulting in 2,597 pages of new law.

    While there are definitely shortcomings in Virginia's 60 and 45 day sessions and the entire part-time legislature concept, I went to look at a couple metrics.

    For example, in the 2014 General Assembly, around 2,750 bills were introduced (minus commending resolutions), 902 were passed, 234 continued to next session, and 980 killed.  The Acts of Assembly are the compilation of every bill we pass.  The 2014 version isn't out yet, but the 2011 Acts of Assembly was 2252 pages long.

    Much of what we do is "housekeeping" where there is no meaningful objection to the legislation.  For example, of the 902 bills we passed, 502 were unanimous.

    Obviously, the Federal Government is a complex entity, it's budget is probably three times longer than Virginia's.  You would think that the U.S. Congress needs to pass at least 5-10 times as much "housekeeping" legislation (or at least pages) as the Virginia General Assembly.  They are not even doing that.

    I recognize that pages do not necessarily reflect substance, and it's not unusual to see a bill that has ten new words and takes up 10 pages.  However, it is really remarkable just how little the U.S. Congress has achieved in a two year session when you compare it to the typical product of our part-time, 45-60 day legislature.
  • A Few Thoughts on Week One of the McDonnell Trial
    Johnnie Williams' Smith Mountain Lake Vacation Home
    It has been a sad and sordid week in Richmond.  My General Assembly Office overlooks the Federal Courthouse.  I'm glad I'm not there to see this depressing spectacle in person.  A few initial thoughts.  

    First, this trial is highlighting some of the worst parts of the political system in Virginia.  The talk about a New York shopping trip$5,000 bottles of cognac, free yard work, requesting free Land Rovers for children, Ferarris and rolexes, free golf equipment, no interest $120,000 and $50,000 loans, covered wedding receptions, and $10,000 wedding gifts has not been pretty.  

    Johnnie Williams unabashedly asserting that he gave money and gifts to gain "access" and legitimize his company and its product only serves to reinforce the most pessimistic assumptions that many Virginians hold about politicians and donors that government is for sale.  Not every donor is looking for "access" or something in return for their contribution.  Some donors, mainly individuals, contribute because of their interest in public policy issues or over-arching government philosophies.  However, this trial - no matter what the outcome - will only serve to further undermine public confidence in government.

    This trial only reiterates the need for actual ethics and campaign finance reform in the Virginia, and the problems created by the Citizen's United ruling and its progeny.  

    Second, while much of the media focus has been on the Hobbs Act charges - the quid pro quo stuff - there has been very little media focus on the loan fraud and obstruction charges which I view as quite strong.  Yesterday, Williams testified about receiving a note from Mrs. McDonnell attempting to return clothing two years after it was given (to make it appear to be a loan and not a gift) and during the midst of an FBI invetigation, and attempting to reframe their relationship as personal friendship.  That's hard to defend.

    Additionally, the Governor and his wife left $120,000 and $50,000 of debt off a loan application while refinancing several mortgages.  There were all kinds of public statements that these payments were loans and not gifts.  We haven't heard any evidence explaining the omission, but it's hard to imagine how someone could have forgotten that someone lent them over $170,000 to get them through a financial crisis within a year or two of the loan being made (however, note that Johnnie Williams did the same thing and isn't being prosecuted, presumably because of his immunity agreement).  

    Third, we will see if this "crush defense" will work, but I am having a hard time reconciling the assertions that Mrs. McDonnell was ignored to the extent that she hated the Governor, their marriage was in shambles, and had a crush on Johnnie Williams, so she felt it necessary to get the object of her affection to buy a $7,500 watch for her husband and share all of these luxury experiences with him.  Things like watches and pictures speak a thousand words.  The watch and the smiling picture of the McDonnells in a Ferrari are hard to get around.  

    Lastly, having been on the receiving end of a prosecution as defense counsel, it is important to remember that everyone is innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in this country, the cross-examination of Johnie Williams is about to begin and the defense has not put on a single witness yet.  

    There are two (and sometimes three or four) sides to every story.  The right to trial by jury is sacred in Virginia and whether the government has met its burden of proof to prove its case beyond a reasonable doubt will be for twelve Virginians to sort out after all the evidence is in.  
  • VDOT Unveils Extended U.S. 1 Merge Lane for I-495 Express Lanes
    Last month, I posted that VDOT had agreed to extend the merge lanes for all traffic from U.S. 1 onto the Beltway's southbound/eastbound express lanes after one of my constituents noticed the unsafe merging conditions.

    The interchange is used by many 44th District residents and City of Alexandria residents on a daily basis.

    A diagram of the new lane design is attached and it was implemented on July 23.  Let me know if you have any feedback!
  • Newly Released - Mount Vernon History Revisited!
    Waynewood resident Michael Bohn and former Patch Reporter Jessie Biele have come out with a new book that focuses on local history called, Mount Vernon - Revisited.

    I picked up a copy a few weeks ago at the Village Hardware.  It's a good primer into the early 44th District and provides some perspective as to how we got to where we are today in the 44th District.

    Over the past two decades, Mike has written several series in the Mount Vernon Gazette focused on the Mount Vernon Trolley, old prominent homes in the Mt. Vernon area, and old Mount Vernon schools.  I published a series of them on this blog:


    My favorite pictures are the old shots of U.S. 1 before it was four-laned and straightened out in the 1930's.

    It's a quick must read for anyone whose zip code is between 22306 and 22309!

    The text of the press release from the publisher is below the fold.


    Revisit the History of the Mount Vernon CommunityLocal authors Jessie Biele and Michael K. Bohn share vintage images
     Mount Vernon Revisited, by Jessie Biele and Michael Bohn is part of Arcadia Publishing’s “Images of America” series of local history books. Through 215 photographs, paintings, and maps, the book surveys the 340-year arc of history of the Mount Vernon area of Fairfax County, Va., a locale that is as interesting and varied as any in the country.  
    The book highlights the evolution of the Mount Vernon Estate and nearby landmarks, and describes other periods, milestones, and societal developments. Included are the economic rejuvenation of the area by a group of Quaker families in the mid-1800s; the Civil War; the coming of the trolley, and later the Mount Vernon Parkway; Fort Hunt; two World Wars; and finally, the suburban explosion of the 1950s and 1960s. Neighborhoods and sites along the Potomac River are laden with history, including landmarks such Woodlawn Plantation, Gum Springs, Pohick Church, Fort Belvoir and Gunston Hall. Mount Vernon Revisited captures all of these landmarks and events in an effort to preserve the area’s history for generations to come.
    Miss Biele is a journalist as well as a marketing and communications professional. She is the former editor of Mount Vernon Patch, a local news website that covered the Mount Vernon community. Ms. Biele’s work has appeared in VivaTysons magazine, RunWashingtonMagazine, and AmStat, the American Statistical Association’s journal. 
    Mr. Bohn writes for McClatchy Newspapers, which range from the Miami Herald to the Anchorage Daily News; McClatchy-Tribune News Service, an international wire service; the Washington Post magazine; and the Connection Newspapers. This is his sixth nonfiction book since 2003. 
    Available at Mount Vernon area bookstores and retailers, online retailers, or through Arcadia Publishing at 888-313-2665 or http://www.arcadiapublishing.com/9781467121132/Mount-Vernon-Revisited
  • Gum Springs Pride Circa 1966
    The 44th District is home to Gum Springs - the oldest historically black neighborhood in Fairfax County tracing its roots back to its found Wes Ford - a freed slave of George Washington.

    Gum Springs has endured many challenges through the years and often had to fight for its fair share of resources from the federal, state, and local government.  My grandparents were involved in many of these fights starting when they moved to Mt. Vernon in 1941.

    The President of the New Gum Springs Civic Association has forwarded me a link to this fascinating movie made in Gum Springs nearly fifty years ago when Fairfax County was first beginning to confront the effects of desegregation in 1966.

    It is a fascinating glimpse into Mt. Vernon's past including a great cameo from then-Mt. Vernon District Supervisor and future Eighth District Congressman Herb Harris.




  • DoD to Contribute $23,798,603 to Expand Ft. Belvoir Elementary
    Fort Belvoir Elementary School opened in 1998 and quickly became one of the largest elementary schools in Washington Metropolitan Area.  Population at the base has continued to explode as the Army has renovated and added housing units on base.

    Normally, when new development brings new families and infrastructure needs, localities can require developers to pay proffers, which are passed along to homeowners, to help cover the public infrastructure costs.  When the Federal Government creates development, that is not possible.

    Last week, the Department of Defense announced a grant of $23,798,603 to Fairfax County Public Schools.  The press release says:
    Fairfax County Public Schools will use its grant to renovate, repair and construct new classrooms at Fort Belvoir Elementary School to address the capacity and facility condition deficiencies that placed the school on the Deputy Secretary of Defense Priority List at #26. The school will serve over 1,590 military connected students in grades kindergarten through sixth.
    Given that FCPS is currently facing a capital backlog of over $1 billion, this will allow the FCPS to focus on other renovation priorities.

    Thank you Uncle Sam!